Tag Archives: China

The big Brexit question – what are my export options?

 

 

William Shakespeare once wrote, “The world’s mine oyster, which I with sword will open”. Now, in the wake of Brexit, it’s less clear whether the oyster is becoming more difficult to open, or whether our sword isn’t as sharp or powerful as it used to be. Nonetheless, the fact remains that we need to break open the shell to get to the good stuff.

 

Brexit

 

The government has recently released official guidance for UK businesses on how to prepare for Brexit. The main takeaway for those who run a business which imports or exports goods is that you should apply for a UK Economic Operator Registration and Identification Number if you are planning to continue to trade with the EU after Brexit. Once you have done that, you will need to research the customs declarations requirements for your industry. However, if you provide services to the EU, there could be new rules to watch out for when dealing with EU countries. These will most likely affect businesses that:

 

  • – have an office in the EU
  • – operate within a service sector anywhere in the EU
  • – are planning a merger with an EU-based company
  • – have employees who travel to the EU on business.

 

 

Now, of course, it is impossible at this stage for anyone to know exactly how Brexit will pan out; however, like most things in life, when one door closes another opens. All you need is to know where to look. In post-Brexit Britain it may be worth exploring new trading opportunities for your business with other non-EU countries. Take for example Russia, India and China, all of which boast healthy economies and offer plenty of opportunities.

 

Export

 

It’s almost too easy to get discouraged and distracted, particularly with so much noise surrounding the doors to Europe threatening to slam shut. Come what may, it’s crucial that British business doesn’t lose sight of the bigger picture.

 

 

Are you considering exporting to a non-EU country post-Brexit? If you are, make sure you understand the key export control documents required for that specific country. For instance, some Arab countries ask exporters to provide an Arab-British Certificate of Origin with every shipment. You may also be required to submit Arabic translations for some of your documents in order to obtain this.

 

 

Similarly, if you are trading with Chinese companies, they will need approval from the transmitting Chinese bank for payments in foreign currency. They will need you to present both English and Chinese versions of the written contract – signed by all parties – and invoice for each payment to the Chinese bank.

 

 

Once you have your foot in the door, we here at Surrey Translation Bureau will be happy to help remove any language barriers standing in your way. Feel free to get in touch with us to discuss your translation needs. Email us on hello@surreytranslation.co.uk or call us on 01252 733 999.

 

Written by Ashley Mikkola

A guide to exporting to China

 

China – often referred to as ‘the world’s factory’ – has seen unparalleled economic success in the past few decades. No other country produces and exports more goods, and China is also the second largest importer in the world.

 

To successfully trade with China, it is vital to be able to communicate with trade partners. This also applies to potential customers in China – over 1.3 billion of them! –who have requirements that local companies’ products often cannot meet. Chinese culture, too, needs to be considered as this can differ significantly from what westerners are used to. This is where translation and localisation come into play.

 

Exporting to China graphic

 

Besides Standard Chinese and Mandarin, there is a huge linguistic diversity in China that exporters need to be aware of. This means that the Chinese market should never be treated as a single market, instead the focus should be on specific areas or regions – don’t just rely on one dialect and hope to reach the majority of the population. Furthermore, it should never be assumed that potential business partners speak English.

 

Regulations and bureaucracy can also be a big hurdle for companies wishing to export their products and services to the Chinese market. Goods that are sold in China must be supplied with a label that includes all relevant information (including content and warnings) written in Chinese.

 

The ‘Great Firewall of China’ slows down internet traffic across the borders and blocks most social media websites; with this in mind, instead of trying to connect with your potential customers via Facebook or Twitter, you might want to try using local versions like Sina Weibo, a microblogging website that currently boasts more than 350 million active users.

 

To this day, investors from abroad can struggle with Chinese values, some of which are based on the teachings of Confucius and Communism, and put family and the government above any kind of commercialism. Besides these values, it is also important to be aware of different behavioural structures and a complex business culture – gestures can be interpreted differently, questions can seem too personal and in Southern China, where superstition is rife, the number four should be avoided, whereas the number eight might just be the deciding factor for a partnership. It takes time to build trust and it is often quite common to go out for drinks and food with potential business partners.

 

Britain is one of the top 10 exporters to China – providing anything from luxury vehicles to fashion, as well as environmental solutions – with exports having almost doubled in the past decade and now totalling a staggering GBP 1 billion every month.

 

Successfully exporting to a country like China will require a lot of hard work and resources; working with a professional agency providing Chinese translation services can go a long way to helping you in this endeavour.

 

Call 01252733999 or email hello@surreytranslation.co.uk to get in touch with Surrey Translation Bureau today to see how their Chinese translators can help you expand your business in China.