Tag Archives: Brexit

A-level results and Brexit: Au revoir to French, but hola to everyone

 

Yesterday’s A-level results showed that Spanish has overtaken French as the most popular language studied at A-level for the first time, while the number of students taking German and French has fallen by 41 and 36 percent respectively. With Brexit looming in two months’ time, there are question marks over the UK and its future relationship with the EU, with many believing that European languages will become less valuable after 31 October. However, the British Academy warns that decreasing numbers in modern languages could harm the chances of the UK “achieving its strategic goals”, a view that all passionate linguists will agree with, particularly those working for a professional translation agency like Surrey Translation Bureau.

 

languages

 

Boris Johnson’s statement earlier this week that “the single biggest deal we need to do is a free trade agreement with our friends and partners over the Channel” shows that the need for professional linguists will not suddenly disappear on 1 November – there will be a period of readjustment, no doubt involving contributions from both translators and interpreters, which will certainly maintain the need for proficient speakers of European languages at least in the short term. Depending on the results of these discussions, this need may even increase.

 

If, on the other hand, the UK’s ties with its European partners become less relevant in the future, it will need to increase international trade with other non-EU countries. If these countries are in South America or Africa, for example, proficient users of Spanish, Portuguese and French will be required. With this year’s A-level performance and the continued reduction in the overall number of students studying languages, one positive aspect is the increased number of job opportunities, both in the UK and abroad, for the few who do.

 

Equally, Brexit may create a demand for non-EU language combinations. According to fft education datalab, entries in other modern languages (which includes Italian, Russian and Chinese, among others) have overtaken entries for French, German and Spanish since 2016 – an exciting prospect for linguistic diversity among language enthusiasts.

 

A'level entries in French, German and Spanish

 

Even during the first week of my internship at Surrey Translation Bureau, I was surprised and delighted to discover the vast range of language pairs required by their clients for modern international trade from English to German to the more unusual request for English to Brazilian Portuguese.

 

Learning languages is hard as it requires perseverance and commitment, but doesn’t that make it more rewarding? At any level of study, a language will open up new worlds to you, for both personal enjoyment and for business. The current uncertainty surrounding Brexit means that no one can say which languages will be most sought-after for business in the future, but one thing is certain: in the multicultural professional world and our diverse modern society, learning a language will never be a waste of time.

 

If you are interested in internship opportunities with Surrey Translation Bureau, please send your CV and a cover letter of what you would hope to gain from the experience to our intern coordinator, Amey Higgon, at A.Higgon@surreytranslation.co.uk.

 

Written by Natasha Craig (Intern at Surrey Translation Bureau)

The big Brexit question – what are my export options?

 

 

William Shakespeare once wrote, “The world’s mine oyster, which I with sword will open”. Now, in the wake of Brexit, it’s less clear whether the oyster is becoming more difficult to open, or whether our sword isn’t as sharp or powerful as it used to be. Nonetheless, the fact remains that we need to break open the shell to get to the good stuff.

 

Brexit

 

The government has recently released official guidance for UK businesses on how to prepare for Brexit. The main takeaway for those who run a business which imports or exports goods is that you should apply for a UK Economic Operator Registration and Identification Number if you are planning to continue to trade with the EU after Brexit. Once you have done that, you will need to research the customs declarations requirements for your industry. However, if you provide services to the EU, there could be new rules to watch out for when dealing with EU countries. These will most likely affect businesses that:

 

  • – have an office in the EU
  • – operate within a service sector anywhere in the EU
  • – are planning a merger with an EU-based company
  • – have employees who travel to the EU on business.

 

 

Now, of course, it is impossible at this stage for anyone to know exactly how Brexit will pan out; however, like most things in life, when one door closes another opens. All you need is to know where to look. In post-Brexit Britain it may be worth exploring new trading opportunities for your business with other non-EU countries. Take for example Russia, India and China, all of which boast healthy economies and offer plenty of opportunities.

 

Export

 

It’s almost too easy to get discouraged and distracted, particularly with so much noise surrounding the doors to Europe threatening to slam shut. Come what may, it’s crucial that British business doesn’t lose sight of the bigger picture.

 

 

Are you considering exporting to a non-EU country post-Brexit? If you are, make sure you understand the key export control documents required for that specific country. For instance, some Arab countries ask exporters to provide an Arab-British Certificate of Origin with every shipment. You may also be required to submit Arabic translations for some of your documents in order to obtain this.

 

 

Similarly, if you are trading with Chinese companies, they will need approval from the transmitting Chinese bank for payments in foreign currency. They will need you to present both English and Chinese versions of the written contract – signed by all parties – and invoice for each payment to the Chinese bank.

 

 

Once you have your foot in the door, we here at Surrey Translation Bureau will be happy to help remove any language barriers standing in your way. Feel free to get in touch with us to discuss your translation needs. Email us on hello@surreytranslation.co.uk or call us on 01252 733 999.

 

Written by Ashley Mikkola